Last week all eyes were on the 1,800 exhibitors at Milan’s Salone del Mobile as they subtly – and sometimes not so subtly – gave pointers as to what the next big interiors trends will be over the coming year.

C.P. Hart’s Design and Merchandising teams were among the swarms of interior and design professionals in attendance (up 17% on last year's turn-out) at one of the most important design trade fairs in the world, to spot the themes you can expect to see in the bathroom and interior design world very soon. Here is a summary of these design trends, as identified by Yousef Mansuri, our Head of Retail Design:

Warm Neutrals 

A new colour palette permeated the halls at Salone – earthy beiges and putty tones brought a sense of warmth and comfort to furniture, furnishings and room schemes. These soothing neutrals were perfectly paired with natural materials and finishes, such as wood grain and marble, whilst black accents added a high-end contrast.

{Clockwise from top left: Artelinea; Gubi; BetteLux Oval Couture; Cielo; Gubi}

Vertical Horizon

Tiles were standing up and designers were taking notice at many of the bathroom stands. The vertical stack bond layout of metro tiles is being used more and more to create drama and order simultaneously, making a welcome change from the popular brick formation. At the Elle Decor exhibition at FuoriSalone, a selection of pastel colours was used to great effect. 


{Elle Decor Millennials At Home exhibition; Ex.t; Lithea}

Must-Have Metallics

A greater assortment of brassware finishes is available than ever before and they’re making a striking statement. Gessi led the charge with the launch of the Inciso collection – designed by David Rockwell – in warm matt industrial finishes such as black, nickel and bronze. AXOR displayed a line-up of unique options such as red gold and stainless steel optic. 


{Top row: Gessi Rilievo in collaboration with HBA; Gessi Inciso – Middle row: Samuel Heath Landmark Pure; Gessi 316; Samuel Heath – Bottom row: Gessi Incisco; Axor MyEdition}

Multi-Functional Furniture

Bathroom furniture is further blurring the lines between living areas, with units that wouldn’t look out of place in the rest of the home. This new wave of versatile freestanding furniture combines practical storage solutions, mirrors and seating that can be moved around at a moment’s notice. Integrated make-up and dressing tables in the bathroom also proved popular at this year's event.


{Clockwise from top left: Novello Oblon; unknown; Cerasa; Elle Decor Millennials At Home exhibition; Novello Libera}

After-Dark Glamour 

Soft Scandi shades were still present in Milan, however they were joined by rich greens and vibrant blues matched with dark woods for maximum impact. The influx of warm metallic and matt black taps provides the ideal accompaniment for either a contemporary or classic look. 


{Clockwise from top left: Cerasa; the Mahdavi collection by Bisazza Bagno; Cerasa; Dornbracht}

Light Relief

The light fixtures on display at Salone ensured the trend for unique statement lighting was shining bright. Bold circular shapes, mid-century-modern silhouettes and multi-pronged fixtures served as a reminder that lighting doesn’t always have to be an understated feature. 


{Light fixtures seen at Gessi, Gubi & Cerasa}

Powdered Ceramics 

While brassware could be found in both matt and highly polished finishes, many of the baths and basins at the exhibition were lustreless. From dove greys to forest greens, these muted tones are the practical choice – less likely to show up finger marks – as well as being supremely tactile and stylish. 


{Clockwise from top left:Alape; BetteLux Oval Silhouette; Artelinea Dama; Cielo}

Beyond Our Shores

Travel to far-flung destinations – Morocco in particular – was another trend seen throughout Salone, and this was encompassed in JEE-O’s Bloom collection designed by Edward van Vliet. Familiar shapes blend with exotic hexagons and octagons for a sense of escapism. 

{Bloom collection by JEE-O – designed by Edward van Vliet}

Last week all eyes were on the 1,800 exhibitors at Milan’s Salone del Mobile as they subtly – and sometimes not so subtly – gave pointers as to what the next big interiors trends will be over the coming year.

C.P. Hart’s Design and Merchandising teams were among the swarms of interior and design professionals in attendance (up 17% on last year's turn-out) at one of the most important design trade fairs in the world, to spot the themes you can expect to see in the bathroom and interior design world very soon. Here is a summary of these design trends, as identified by Yousef Mansuri, our Head of Retail Design:

Warm Neutrals 

A new colour palette permeated the halls at Salone – earthy beiges and putty tones brought a sense of warmth and comfort to furniture, furnishings and room schemes. These soothing neutrals were perfectly paired with natural materials and finishes, such as wood grain and marble, whilst black accents added a high-end contrast.

{Clockwise from top left: Artelinea; Gubi; BetteLux Oval Couture; Cielo; Gubi}

Vertical Horizon

Tiles were standing up and designers were taking notice at many of the bathroom stands. The vertical stack bond layout of metro tiles is being used more and more to create drama and order simultaneously, making a welcome change from the popular brick formation. At the Elle Decor exhibition at FuoriSalone, a selection of pastel colours was used to great effect. 


{Elle Decor Millennials At Home exhibition; Ex.t; Lithea}

Must-Have Metallics

A greater assortment of brassware finishes is available than ever before and they’re making a striking statement. Gessi led the charge with the launch of the Inciso collection – designed by David Rockwell – in warm matt industrial finishes such as black, nickel and bronze. AXOR displayed a line-up of unique options such as red gold and stainless steel optic. 


{Top row: Gessi Rilievo in collaboration with HBA; Gessi Inciso – Middle row: Samuel Heath Landmark Pure; Gessi 316; Samuel Heath – Bottom row: Gessi Incisco; Axor MyEdition}

Multi-Functional Furniture

Bathroom furniture is further blurring the lines between living areas, with units that wouldn’t look out of place in the rest of the home. This new wave of versatile freestanding furniture combines practical storage solutions, mirrors and seating that can be moved around at a moment’s notice. Integrated make-up and dressing tables in the bathroom also proved popular at this year's event.


{Clockwise from top left: Novello Oblon; unknown; Cerasa; Elle Decor Millennials At Home exhibition; Novello Libera}

After-Dark Glamour 

Soft Scandi shades were still present in Milan, however they were joined by rich greens and vibrant blues matched with dark woods for maximum impact. The influx of warm metallic and matt black taps provides the ideal accompaniment for either a contemporary or classic look. 


{Clockwise from top left: Cerasa; the Mahdavi collection by Bisazza Bagno; Cerasa; Dornbracht}

Light Relief

The light fixtures on display at Salone ensured the trend for unique statement lighting was shining bright. Bold circular shapes, mid-century-modern silhouettes and multi-pronged fixtures served as a reminder that lighting doesn’t always have to be an understated feature. 


{Light fixtures seen at Gessi, Gubi & Cerasa}

Powdered Ceramics 

While brassware could be found in both matt and highly polished finishes, many of the baths and basins at the exhibition were lustreless. From dove greys to forest greens, these muted tones are the practical choice – less likely to show up finger marks – as well as being supremely tactile and stylish. 


{Clockwise from top left:Alape; BetteLux Oval Silhouette; Artelinea Dama; Cielo}

Beyond Our Shores

Travel to far-flung destinations – Morocco in particular – was another trend seen throughout Salone, and this was encompassed in JEE-O’s Bloom collection designed by Edward van Vliet. Familiar shapes blend with exotic hexagons and octagons for a sense of escapism. 

{Bloom collection by JEE-O – designed by Edward van Vliet}

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here